Dessert Comes First

An obsession with dessert and other unabashed opinions of a food writer

Magnum White King
32
comments

Food Photo Thursday: A Devotion To Eggs

posted by in Cafés, The Best... Lists

Some photos that publicly proclaim my love for eggs.

Note: Every Thursday, post a food photo: it can be of what you’re eating, what you want to eat, etc. It can be shot with any device, from a mobile phone, tablet, to a regular camera – point & shoot or SLR. It’s all up to you but it must be YOUR photo, no ripping off of somebody else’s work. And please include a short description. We want to know what it is and where to eat it too, if possible.

It’s been a long time since I’ve done an egg post. Here’s the original, the one that started it all, and at the end of this piece are the rest of my essays on the humble egg. A few mornings ago, I make an all-egg white omelet for breakfast stuffed with red beans. I eat it with whole-grain toast and it’s tasty enough, but I can’t help but notice how anemic – pale! – the eggs look when divorced from their yolks.

Inherently more flavorful than the unfortunate brekkie I make are these two dishes where the egg, rightfully, plays a starring role. The cover photo above is that of the Grilled Asparagus with Roasted Shiitake Mushrooms and Truffled Egg as served at Malcolm’s Place. Shorn of their woody stems, the green spears have a toothsome texture, their pencil-thin bodies slick with olive oil. Contrasting with their crispness are the mushrooms, meaty and bold. Their macho character seems to overwhelm the seemingly plain, poached egg. But then the egg’s bulging orb is pierced and a voluptuous imagining comes to life in a glory that seeps and spreads: gold over green.

Another evening, I’m at Mamou. My friends and I have decided that we’re not ordering the steak because it’s become our default dish. So they both order the Lamb Tapa and I get the Roast Pork & Chicken (P345, half portion). I’ve not been back to Mamou for more than six months so I want to jump onto the table with glee when I see that a duck egg is available as a side order.

Though the whites of a duck egg are more rubbery than that of a chicken’s, there’s no comparing their yolks. A yolk from a duck egg is like the orange of a setting sunset or the stigmas of saffron when steeped in hot liquid. The yolk, broken as it is over my red beans and rice, runs its languid course, staining and spilling. With a sprinkle of salt, the flavor of an egg melds with its partners and melts into my memory.

~~
Malcolm’s Place
138 H.V. Dela Costa St., Salcedo Village, Makati
(02) 403.9484

Mamou
On Facebook: www.facebook.com/mamouahomekitchen

My Other Egg Musings:
Lucky Duck
Adventures with an Ostrich Egg
The P200 Egg

32 Responses to “Food Photo Thursday: A Devotion To Eggs”

  • egg tart from Spring by Ha Yuan (I think I’ll go have lunch there soon)

    [img]http://dessertcomesfirst.com/useruploads/photo.JPG[/img]

    [Reply]

  • Hi Lori,

    Im just as fascinated with eggs as you are, how it seems to be simple yet requires a diligent approach to get it right.

    [img]http://dessertcomesfirst.com/useruploads/IMG_0010.JPG[/img]

    This is Jay Gamboa’s 65 degree egg, composed of Jamon Iberico, Olive Oil, Pedro Ximenez vinegar, Piment d’ Espellete and Smoked Maldon Salt, Croutons.

    Dont know if it’s on the regular menu, had it at a wine tasting in Cirkulo.

    Very exquisite.

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    I’ve heard so much about this egg but never knew what it looked like. Now I do, thanks to you, Ariel.

    [Reply]

  • [img]http://dessertcomesfirst.com/useruploads/Yabu02.jpg[/img]

    Special Katsudon
    Yabu, House of Katsu

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    Ack, this photo kills me, it just kills me…

    [Reply]

  • I like it also when an egg is front and center like in a bowl of Bibimbap where its glorious golden orb is surrounded by a throng of ingredients. This one is from Bulgogi Brothers.
    [img]http://dessertcomesfirst.com/useruploads/DCFBulgogiBibimbap.jpg[/img]

    [Reply]

  • Weekday breakfast vs weekend breakfast
    [img]http://dessertcomesfirst.com/useruploads/JMT_1289.jpg[/img]

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    Hooray for the decadence of weekends!

    [Reply]

  • [img]http://dessertcomesfirst.com/useruploads/DSC_2065.JPG[/img]

    Eggs Benedict from Tosca (Dusit Thani Manila) has a hint of lemon.

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    My god Joy, I had to enlarge your photo because I just can’t believe how PERFECT that poached egg is! Gads, such succulence just waiting to emerge.

    [Reply]

    Katrina Reply:

    Me, too — I enlarged that photo last night and just stared and stared at the perfect poached egg! Considering how I can’t even fry an egg properly yet, that beautifully smooth voluptuousness is far beyond my reach…that is, unless I make my way to Tosca soon! :-D

    [Reply]

  • Crazy about eggs, too, to the point that I think I’ve been taking in more than the recommended amount per week – most sources say three maximum, while I have it almost every day :|.

    I just love how they’re so versatile. It’s a wonder how many things can be done with a single ingredient :)

    [Reply]

  • Farm fresh egg yolks (from a layer farm in Batangas)

    [Reply]

  • Oh and do chocolate eggs count? :”> Keeping myself from lamenting the fact that I have no real egg photo to share!
    [img]http://dessertcomesfirst.com/useruploads/choc_lindt_lindor-1.jpg[/img]

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    All kinds of eggs count, even those without a flowing, gleaming orb :p

    [Reply]

  • So egg-y!

    I have no photo post now that has egg in it so I won’t upload a photo today.

    But this reminds me to make Shakshouka this weekend!

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    The Mediterranean version of huevos rancheros! Wow Aji, where did you learn how to make shakshouka?

    [Reply]

    aji Reply:

    Hi Lori,

    I learned how to make it when I saw a mouth-watering picture of it in one of the posts of David Lebovitz last year. I scanned the web for the most authentic as possible recipe.

    I find it best when the tomato base has been made at least 1 day in advance so the flavors of the base really meld together.

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    Aji-
    Thanks for the tip. I’ll try making it one time.

  • Wow, I’m amazed – and pleased – that everyone seems to have an egg photo to post today. But no pressure on those who would prefer to post a non-egg photo. These Food Photo Thursdays are hardly ever themed, anyway :)

    [Reply]

  • [img]http://dessertcomesfirst.com/useruploads/eggandtoast.jpg[/img]
    Eggs and bread never go off my grocery list! :)

    [Reply]

  • My eggyolk picture. It’s from one of my farm visit in Batangas.

    http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5030/5590800636_61c81a0873_b.jpg

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    Stunning Wyatt, absolutely. I have a photo similar to yours. Thanks for sharing.

    [Reply]

  • Unfortunately, I lost many years’ worth of pictures two years ago, so I don’t have an egg photo to post. I just wanted to tell you (in case I haven’t yet) that you are responsible for my appreciating and enjoying runny yolks now. I only used to be able to eat eggs with the yolk completely solid. But your many posts and pictures of beautifully oozing, golden yolks made me rethink my position and give runny yolks another try. And now I love it!

    I rarely used to buy eggs in the grocery, not only because I don’t really cook, but also because the few times I would, eggs were not often a main ingredient. But now I usually have eggs in stock at home. In fact, I just had a fried egg as part of my dinner tonight. I still can’t seem to perfect my fried eggs, though, and the one time I attempted to poach an egg the traditional way, it didn’t work. Poaching eggs in the microwave is a neat trick, though it’s still hit or miss. I do better with scrambling them. Nevertheless, if not for you, I wouldn’t keep trying. So, thank you for my newfound egg-love, Lori!

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    Oh Katrina, I’m touched, SO touched! Thank you. Flowy, lush eggs are my favorite. It’s taken me some time to learn how to cook eggs to my liking but I’ve mastered the important techniques I think, except for poaching. That one still needs work.

    [Reply]

  • Oh, and I have to say that the photo Wyatt posted is absolutely STUNNING! Such perfectly arranged yolks, each glowing orb plump and glimmering — they almost don’t look like eggs at all!

    [Reply]

  • From Sugi :) This was a monthly special, but can still be ordered :)

    MAGURO YUKE ONTAMA ZOE

    Minced fresh tuna and squid with raddish sprouts tossed in a special sauce and topped with a poached egg and crispy japanese rice paper!
    [img]http://dessertcomesfirst.com/useruploads/egg.jpg[/img]

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    Ines!
    Thanks for sharing this photo. Am scribbling the name of this dish so that I won’t forget.

    [Reply]

  • Gorgeous croque madame at Thomas Keller’s Bouchon in Las Vegas. I just think croque madame’s are one of the best brunch items!
    [img]http://dessertcomesfirst.com/useruploads/croquemadame.jpg[/img]

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    Regine-
    I think I feel quite faint right now. That is a painfully gorgeous fried egg. What kind of sauce is it bathing in?

    [Reply]

    Katrina Reply:

    I love Croque Monsieur and Croque Madame, but most places, even in Paris, don’t do it well. THAT, however, looks truly amazing. I don’t think that’s even a fried egg; it looks like it’s poached as beautifully as the one from Tosca. I’m very curious what that sauce is (too white to be Hollandaise), and the dark brown bread, as well.

    [Reply]

    Regine Rafael Reply:

    Lori,

    It’s actually Mornay sauce (half gruyere & half parmesan cheese) sprinkled with parsley — This is egg porn at its finest.

    Katrina,

    The bread used is brioche, and it truly, truly was amazing. Every last bite. :)

    [Reply]

Leave a Reply





Heads up! You are attempting to upload an invalid image. If saved, this image will not display with your comment.

Top 10 Books of 2013

Follow Us

Followgram