Dessert Comes First

An obsession with dessert and other unabashed opinions of a food writer

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Breakfast at Wildflour (last of 2 Parts)

posted by in Cafés, Restaurants

In this series:
Dinner at Wildflour

Dinner here last night. This morning, back for breakfast.

Not content to write about Wildflour on the basis of just one visit, I decide to go back for breakfast. A guy I know has never been to this bakery+café for any other meal except the first one of the day. “I see it as a breakfast place, it appeals most to me then,” he says.

Being big on breakfast myself – you can take away my lunch and dinner, but don’t you dare touch my brekkie, I’m here at 8:15 am on a weekday. There’s plenty of space taken up mostly by expats so it’s quite relaxed. Saturday breakfast is another story altogether however.

My first order is what I’d been eyeing since dinner last night: the suggestively named Hazelnut Hot Chocolate (hello, Nutella!) Ordered with the Wildflour donut (P215 together) – I choose a Nutella [donut] over the strawberry option for a doubly devilish starter. One sip, thick and fragrant, of this potent potion is all I need to tell you that this hot chocolate blows a similar beverage served at Maitre Chocolatier clear out of the water. Thick but not sludgy, it caresses the throat with a lick of cream and that beloved commingling of hazelnut and chocolate. I do my duty by dipping the donut into the drink, and immediately feel my spine go slack from pleasure.

The naughty glint of this Nutella donut will get me into trouble.

Because I was so disappointed with the dry Sticky Bun (P130) I had last night, I’m ready to write off this pastry – they are called “sticky” for a reason. I’m encouraged to give it another go however when I’m told that this morning, they’re freshly made. Made with the lush brioche dough that Wildflour’s Croque Madame is made from, this sticky bun rectifies its initial impression. Lip-sticky and lovely, its coils conceal a cache of caramel bolstered by brown sugar and vanilla. If you order this and/or the donut (above) please specify that they should be served warm. You’ll be doing yourself an injustice otherwise.

Here’s the Wildflour Breakfast (P390), a plate of possibilities presented to perk up my morning. It’s a study in the glory of gold: two fried eggs perfectly cooked, crisp-coated potato wedges that are so difficult to do at home but excellently rendered here, and slices of buttered, ciabatta-like bread with its characteristic larger holes and a looser crumb. The sausages here, made on the premises, are spicy and scattered with caraway seeds; the lingering licorice note emphasizes the sausage’s meatiness.

A weekday breakfast at Wildflour is relaxing, certainly the time to come when you yearn to experience the best of what this bakery+café has to offer minus the mania (and explosive decibel levels) of the dinner crowd. As I eat, I look at the morning’s beauty shining through the glass windows, a pastiche of light and shadow, the glow of a day beautifully burgeoning. I wish all days could start like this.

At a little over two inches thick, the Brioche French Toast (P320) is an intimidating proposition. But as I’ve mentioned, I so love Wildflour’s brioche that the increased surface area almost compels me to rest my head on its pillowy front. Luckily, good sense takes over and really, I don’t quite fancy my face smeared with maple syrup anyway. The amber liquid is infinitely better as an add-on anyway, its subtle mellowness accomplishing that balance of salty-sweet with sausage (P+70), my choice; or with bacon (P+60).

I like my scrambled eggs runny and wet and Wildflour (Scrambled Eggs on Toast [P260]) makes an exceptional version. On a bed of buttered ciabatta lies a cloud spun of gold, egg curds cooked just ‘til barely opaque. Naked and warm, they’re then blanketed with the curiously named “Bacon Gravy.” Such an unflattering moniker for a lavish Mornay sauce, rich with yolks and velvet-smooth, it’s pocked with lardons, strips of bacon fat, its salty smokiness shooting through this stellar offering. I urge you to try this dish, your morning will be all the better for it.

Of course, no breakfast is complete with coffee and for that, Wildflour doesn’t disappoint. They serve the artisan brand, La Mill, and even their simple Americano is hot and bracing. Though I’m more of a black coffee drinker, I’m encouraged to try the Vietnamese Latte (P115/140). Capped with charming heart art, it’s a clever combination of espresso, fresh milk, and condensed milk. Beneath the beverage’s heat, an underlying sweetness sallies forth, resting on the tongue before being hit by another wave of sharp espresso.

~~
Wildflour Café + Bakery
G/F, Net Lima Bldg., 4th Ave. cor. 26th St., Bonifacio Global City, Taguig.
(02) 856 7600
Breakfast from 8am-2pm.
Wildflour will open on Sundays beginning 3rd week September.
Reservations always highly recommended.

27 Responses to “Breakfast at Wildflour (last of 2 Parts)”

  • I just wish they would open on Sundays.

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    Richard Co-
    You didn’t read ’til the end, did you? :p They will be, beginning 3rd week September.

    –lori

    [Reply]

    Richard Co Reply:

    Hahaha. You got me there. I thought that part was the address.

    Can’t wait to try breakfast/brunch.

    [Reply]

  • I’ve been there twice (breakfast and lunch). The second time, the waitstaff forgot what I ordered because they did not take it down. It made my blood boil and I said to myself, I’m not coming back in the next 12 months. But when you blog like this, I’m forced to reconsider my decision.

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    Jesse-
    That *is* unfortunate, but we all have our bad days. Give it another chance. I didn’t overly praise Wildflour. I thoroughly enjoyed myself all the times I’ve been there.
    –lori

    [Reply]

  • increased surface area almost compels me to rest my head on its pillowy front

    The engineer, writer, and DCF-fan in me read this with so much happiness and pride :) I sometimes think this blog is less about food and more about your writing. Keep it up, your fans are waiting :D

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    anotherwise-
    You know, I was having a terrible day until this comment of yours came along. Thank you. I hope YOU are joining my I Love DCF contest.

    –lori

    [Reply]

  • I tried Wildflour on its soft launch day because my friend’s the cousin of the sous chef and we wanted to be supportive. It was a pain to look for its location; I think we drove around BGC for almost an hour. But after tasting their food, we didn’t regret looking for this place. I have yet to try their croque madame (I tried ordering it for dinner then but they said it wasn’t available :( ) but their tomato soup and grilled cheese combo was superb.

    [Reply]

  • I’ve been there only once, for Saturday lunch, and the experience was quite mixed. Although my friends and I loved the place itself, and most of us enjoyed what we ordered, I was the only one who actually praised the food. I think two factors led to this: First, they ran out of brioche, so we were very disappointed that we couldn’t order the oft-praised Croque Madame or the French Toast. (By the way, you didn’t say how the latter tasted. I always hesitate when the bread is sliced thickly, because that usually means it will be dry inside, and I like my French Toast soaked and custardy.) Secondly, the service was, although friendly and well-meaning, just plain inefficient and disorganized. Our reservation was lost, probably because their appointment book had all these little pieces of paper just slipped inside. It’s a good thing my friends are the type who know the power of a firm voice and a raised eyebrow. ;-) I later learned that the same thing happened to another person, so a word to the ones planning to go: double-check your reservation! Also, one waitress kept bringing stuff to our table without knowing anything about them — e.g., she didn’t know what the dish was, so we didn’t know if it belonged to us, or she’d bring us drinks we didn’t order.

    Now, I know it’s a new restaurant, so I’ll give it some leeway. Still, I couldn’t help but wonder if the mishaps were because the head chef was no longer in Manila. It doesn’t seem like such a good idea to leave a restaurant after it’s just opened, especially given the hoards of people descending on it. Nevertheless, I plan to return because nothing that happened was really bad, we still had a good time, and I want to try the Croque Madame, the Bacon Tarte Flambe (I had the one with brie and apples), and the Chocolate Salted Caramel Pot de Creme. However, I think I’ll wait for the hype to die down, and the service level to pick up. ;-)

    [Reply]

  • By the way, have you tried the Sticky Buns from Bag of Beans in Tagaytay? They’re so popular that they often run out. I reserve them before I even choose my main course!

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    Katrina-
    I could always use another sticky bun in my life. :p Thanks for the tip.

    –lori

    [Reply]

  • I woke up unusually early today (early for ME, that is), and realized I actually had time for a breakfast that involved more than pouring cereal and milk into a bowl. Inspired by your post, I decided to make French Toast. I didn’t have any white bread on hand, but I did have some of Baguio Country Club’s famous raisin bread, which I think worked quite well. :-D What a lovely way (and, for me, unusual because it doesn’t involve a hangover) to start the weekend! :-)

    [Reply]

    joey @ 80 Breakfasts Reply:

    Katrina, I’ve actually made French toast with that very same raisin bread (it’s on my blog) before and served it with maple butter apples…I think raisin bread makes a great French toast! Gives it a little something extra :) The best I’ve ever made was using a really old (like months in the freezer) challah :)

    [Reply]

    Katrina Reply:

    I’ve never had challah, but the best French Toast I’ve made was with the famous bread from the Del Monte farm in Bukidnon. I made some candied bacon to go with it, and it was one of the yummiest (and sweetest!) breakfasts ever!

    [Reply]

    anonymous paul Reply:

    I have to second that the bread at the del monte clubhouse (wrote about it) is quite good and I can picture it making a great french toast. Super soft, milky and downy crumb. The brioche at wildflour is richer, finer in texture and you can really taste the butter. Like choosing between kate or pippa.

    Lori Reply:

    Katrina-
    French Toast can be made with any kind of bread, but it’s exceptional with raisin bread and yes, challah too.

    –lori

    [Reply]

    Katrina Reply:

    As a French Toast fan, I’d experiment with any kind of bread. I also love using croissants. I know brioche and challah are supposed to be the best choices, but I’ve never found the latter in Manila.

    [Reply]

    joey @ 80 Breakfasts Reply:

    Hi Katrina, I’ve seen challah in the Gng. Bukid stall at the Salcedo Market :) Aside from the choice of bread, I’ve found that the age also matters. The older the bread the better it’ll hold up…yummy cakey-ness without getting soggy :) I’ve also used croissants (on my blog also — with Nutella filling)…nomnom :)

    Lori/Katrina, we should have breakfast together one day! :)

  • I am definitely going back for some of that scrambled eggs! And the Nutella donut and hot chocolate!! Happy to hear they will be opening on Sundays :)

    [Reply]

  • Oh, Lori. I’m not even hungry and yet this post has got me drooling. Great breads, good coffee – what’s not to love? Date at Wildflour now marked on my calendar :)

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    Maro-
    Reading about breakfast always gets me hungry, no matter what time of day it is.

    –lori

    [Reply]

  • Had breakfast there the week before, the french toast was so dry and not my idea of what frech toast should be. I thnk if you cut it thick then you’d have to soak it well . The service was truly awful,the staff just seemed to disappear and several people had their hands up trying to call attention to the staff and there was just no response. We all looked at each other wondering what was going on. They forgot our coffee orders and, the bill came before they served my husband his coffee. The rest of the food was mediocre at best- waffles and scrambled eggs….sad to say i think the waffles at pancake house are much better.

    [Reply]

  • Hi Lori! It’s when I read your posts that I wish I live in Manila. Hope to visit Wildflower very soon… :)

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    So nice of you to say, Tata. Come visit Wildflour on your next trip to Manila.
    –lori

    [Reply]

  • I dont know why, but during my two separate visits (one for dinner, breakfast the other) at Wildflour, the stuff that i ordered turned out to be too salty. I had steak and fries for dinner. Although the steak was perfectly cooked to my liking, it seemed that it was rolled in a bed of salt after wards. The fries was also much too salted. The Wildflour breakfast’s crispy potatoes also had been overly salted. Is it just me or has anyone else experienced this?

    [Reply]

  • Breakfasts are truly lovely. Now I know where I have to go for this weekend.

    [Reply]

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